Blessed Gizella Archdiocese Collection – The Archbishop’s Palace

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+36 88 426 095

One of the masterpieces of Hungarian Baroque architecture was built between 1765 and 1776 on the basis of plans by the architect of the Esterházy family, Jakab Fellner, at the order of Bishop Ignác Koller. The interior of the building is adorned with plaster stuccos by Giuseppe Orsatti, as well as ceiling frescoes depicting the allegorical figures of the four seasons, which were painted by the Viennese Johann Cymbal in 1772. There are also copper engravings that were made by well-known engravers on the basis of works by Rubens, Poussin, Le Brun, J. Vernet, Watteau and Chardin, a nacre-inlaid settee that was commissioned for the reception of Queen Elisabeth, and some masterpieces of furniture done in the Empire style. The Bishop’s private chapel and the library of Bishop Koller are located in the northern stair house. The chapel’s ceiling is covered by a fresco by Cymbal, and on the northern wall one sees the painting entitled “Ecce Homo” by Ádám Oeser. The altarpiece representing the Patroness of Hungary with Saint Imre and Saint Margaret was made by Ferenc Szoldatits.

The Blessed Gizella Archdiocese Collection presents an exhibition of graphics and paintings entitled From Naples to Venice: Two Centuries of Italian Baroque (17th–18th Centuries). The exhibition focuses on 17th-century and 18th-century Italian Baroque art. The works selected for the exhibition are from collections of former bishops and the workshops of the Neapolitan artists Luca Giordano and Francesco Solimena and the Venetian artist Piazzetta, as well as masterpieces by Caravaggian painters from Rome. The exhibition is connected to four prominent centers of art in Italy: Rome (which was the most significant art center of the seicento), the Kingdom of Naples, Bologna, and the Republic of Venice. Masterpieces of 17th-century and 18th-century art from these centers will be on display.

The Gizella Collection is offering glimpses into the works in its holdings by 17th-century and 18th-century Italian artists, including engravings made on the basis of paintings by Caravaggio, Nicolas Poussin, Carlo Maratta, Pietro da Cortona, Francesco Romanelli, Carracciolo, Salvator Rosa, Solimena, the Carracci brothers, Francesco Albani, Bartolomeo Schedoni, Domenichino, Guido Reni, Guercino, Lucio Massari, the Venetian Bernardo Strozzi, and Giovanni Battista Tiepolo, as well as engravings by Étienne Baudet, Antonio Canegó, Lambert Visscher, Joseph Wagner, Jacob Adam, Pierre-François Basan, Sir Robert Strange, Fra Antonio Lorenzini, and Guillaume Vallet and their source images. The exhibition also includes Giuseppe Vasi’s paintings of Rome and engravings by the Venetian artist Carlo Orsolini.

From the Eternal City, where we see examples of  Caravaggio’s realism, Cortona’s mature Baroque art, Andrea Pozzo’s perspectives on architecture and painting, and works by French painters living in Rome, we travel to Naples, the city “furnished” in the Spanish fashion, the city of folk religion and of the passionate, dramatic art of Jusepe de Ribera. Later, we arrive in Bologna to study the Classicism of the Carracci brothers. Finally, we see works by painters of vedute eternalizing Saint Mark’s Square, the Doge Palace, the Grande Canale, and the Rialto Bridge in Venice, as well as with the most significant master of 18th-century Venetian painting, Giovanni Battista Tiepolo.

The exhibition also offers a selection of works from the Museum of Fine Arts in Budapest, the István Dobó Castle Museum in Eger, the Catholic Museum in Veszprém, and the Ecclesiastic Art Collection of the Matthias Church of Buda Castle in Budapest, connected to 18th-century Italian Baroque painting. From the collection of the Municipal Gallery of the Budapest Historical Museum, an altarpiece made for the Jesuit Church in Budavár by Andrea Pozzo (“Francis Xavier christens Queen Neachile,” Buda, 1709) will also be on display.

The exhibition is open to the public until 31 December 2019 at two venues, the Archiepiscopal Palace of Veszprém and the Tejfalussy Canon House.

Photo: Lajos Kövesdi Róka

Programmes

Temporary exhibition |exhibition, guided tour
The Archiepiscopal Palace of Veszprém was built between 1765 and 1776 on the basis of plans by Jakab Fellner (an architect who worked for... More
Temporary exhibition |exhibition, guided tour
The Blessed Gizella Archdiocese Collection presents an exhibition of graphics and paintings entitled From Naples to Venice: Two Centuries... More
18:00 to 23:00
|exhibition, guided tour
The Blessed Gizella Archdiocese Collection presents an exhibition of graphics and paintings entitled From Naples to Venice: Two Centuries... More